How we work

Some communities in Dar es Salaam desperately trying to stop riverbank erosion by establishing informal dumps. This only makes the problem worse as downstream, the waste creates further silting and blocks drainage canals.

Some communities in Dar es Salaam desperately trying to stop riverbank erosion by establishing informal dumps. This only makes the problem worse as downstream, the waste creates further silting and blocks drainage canals.

Systems change in solid waste management

Without an integrated city-wide system to shift waste from doorsteps to landfill, flooding due to dumping in rivers and flood zones will only get worse

I4ID is approaching the problem from multiple angles because the city requires a holistic system to address multiple failures in policy, municipal management, service delivery and citizen engagement. Municipal governments are failing to contract services effectively, often leaving communities to fend for themselves and local waste collectors to dump in rivers and on the fringes of residential areas. Sometimes fee levels are set so low, that without public subsidy it is impossible to finance a proper transfer of waste without illegal dumping.

Municipal governments are failing their residents and failing Dar es Salaam city.

Professional service providers are discouraged from investing by haphazard fee collection and the short-term, unreliable contracts offered by municipal governments.

Without public subsidy and investment in infrastructure and systems, private operators innovate daily to manage the challenge.

It is expensive for small community waste collectors to transfer waste all the way to the city’s single dumpsite at Pugu, and all companies struggle to persuade residents to pay user-fees when service levels are so weak and unreliable.